Tag: wallflower

Plot #59 Update: June 2016

Plot #59 Update June 2016
What a difference a month makes.

June was a quieter month than you might think, down on Plot #59, thanks to a combination of wet weather and exam revision. Nevertheless, Jo and I forged ahead as best we could and kept things moving on several fronts.

Projects / Maintenance

June 2016 middle section
Our guilty secret, the middle section of the plot that’s usually hidden from view…

The ground was too wet for most of the month to allow any serious digging, but we have made a start on clearing the last properly overgrown section of the plot. More progress in next month’s update, all being well.

Sowing

We found a spare patch of ground in-between the carrot bed and the pea harp, so we’ve sown a couple of rows of swede and a few of turnip for later in the year. The turnips have germinated well and need thinning, but the swedes are a bit sparse. We might have to re-sow to fill the gaps.

Planting

June 2016 - netted brassicas
There are sprouts under all that enviromesh and caulis next door, with a light anti-pigeon drape.

We finally managed to get the first batch of this year’s brassicas planted out and covered over with enviromesh. There are a dozen sprout plants of four different varieties under there, and next door I’ve planted out a few cauliflowers. They’re staked and well-spaced, and we’ll be keeping a closer eye on the watering and clearing dead foliage a lot quicker this year, so hopefully they won’t suffer from the same problems as last year’s plants – sooty mould and wind-rock mostly – and we’ll actually have a decent sprout harvest this winter.

A cauli or two would be nice as well, but it’s the first time we’ve grown them, so we’ll have to wait and see there. We’ve draped a loose net over the top of those to hopefully make the pigeons think twice, and have companion planted a few chives to hopefully keep the brassica pests at bay, but I suspect the diomandback moths have found them already. So it goes.

June 2016 courgette patch
The courgettes are romping away in the mild, wet weather.

The courgettes that we planted out at the end of last month are doing really well. They seem to be doing well in their sheltered location, with a greenhouse to one side, and runner beans / potatoes providing wind-breaks on two others.

Harvesting

As per the latest Harvest Monday post the summer fruit and veg is starting to flood in. Strawberries, raspberries, broad beans, mangetout peas, Swiss chard, potatoes, carrot thinnings, courgettes and garlic are the main crops at the moment. We’re still getting rhubarb, too, with the crowns showing no signs of needing a rest just yet.

June 2016 Extra Early Wight harvest
Three dozen lovely cloves of good-sized garlic – enough to last all winter.
June 2016 -strawberry harvest
Strawberries! A much better showing than last year.
June 2016 first spud harvest
That’s a decent return on a single planted tuber.
June 2016 courgettes, broad beans, peas
Broad beans, golden mangetout peas and a selection of courgettes.

Lovely stuff, and lots more to come.

Floral Department

Jo’s flower beds are really coming into their own as well, with dahlias (an update post on those shortly), lavender, sunflowers, foxgloves, sweet peas, geraniums, lupins, toadflax, ox-eye daisies, marigolds, nasturtiums, tagetes, evening primrose and cornflowers all doing their bit to add splashes of colour and bring the pollinators to the plot.

Here are a few highlights, and I’ll see if I can persuade Jo to put together a floral-themed blog post at some point, too:

June 2016 nasturtium
Trailing nasturtiums are winding through the broad beans
June 2016 mini sunflower
This dwarf sunflower is a miniature star-burst at knee-height.
June 2016 wallflower
Erysimum ‘Bowles Mauve’ is a perennial favourite with bees and allotmenteers alike.
June 2016 toadflax
The tall spires of the freely self-seeding toadflax come in both purple and pink.
June 2016 foxglove
A slightly darker-than-usual shade to this common Digitalis purpurea.
June 2016 yellow lupin
These golden lupins really catch the sunlight.
June 2016 red lupin
These lupins shade from red to dusky pink, depending on the light and weather.

It’s all coming along rather nicely, and judging by the way things have already moved on and changed there’s lots more to come in next month’s round-up.

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A Spot of Structural Work

With a few hundred seedlings coming along nicely in the greenhouse at home, we’ve been busy down at Plot #59, preparing ground and putting up a few of this year’s support structures for the crops to come.

Pea Harp

In the past I’ve grown peas up plastic netting, or just let them scramble through pea sticks. Earlier this year though, I read Jane Merrick’s blog post about her pea harp on heroutdoors.uk and decided to give it a go.

First up, a standard A-frame (bean support, type #3) to provide the bare bones:

May 2016 sweet pea harp framework
The bare bones of the framework in place and ready for stringing.

…and then over to Jo with her smaller hands and nimbler fingers to run a ball of string up and down the frame to provide the vertical support for the peas to scramble up:

May 2016 sweet pea harp fully strung
The finished pea harp, missing only a couple of slug traps… oh, and a few dozen pea plants.

A lovely job, I’m sure you’ll agree. We’ll see how it performs later in the year.

Sweet Pea Obelisks

Over to the decorative department, and a couple of simple obelisk structures for Jo to grow her sweet peas on. All my own work, with four black bamboo canes and a couple of horizontal string sections for additional support and tendril-grips. Jo might add a few more strings later on, depending on how the plants seem to be managing.

May 2016 sweet pea obelisk #1
One of a matching pair framing the path onto the plot.

Willow Wind-Break

We’re not calling this willow weaving, simply because that would be an insult to folks who actually have the skills to weave willow properly. But what Jo and I have done between us is stick some thicker willow branches into the ground (upside-down to reverse polarity and hopefully prevent rooting). Then we’ve rammed, jammed, wedged, bodged and tied in a selection of thinner canes, whips and twigs to sort of make a wind-break (although not a very tall one) and terrier-barrier (our plot neighbour’s dog is very cute, but very inquisitive) for the asparagus patch. All materials (string aside) cropped from the willow tree at the back of the plot, so fully up-cycled, if a bit scruffy in places:

May 2016 willow wind break
Don’t look too closely, folks, it’s not a particularly pretty sight, but it’ll get the job done.

We then transplanted three mature Erysimum ‘Bowle’s Mauve’, which ought to help with the wind-breaking and should be enough to hide a multitude of weaving-related sins.

May 2016 wind-break with wallflowers
Good old Erysimum ‘Bowle’s mauve’ should disguise the worst of it…

More structural work to come in due course: plenty of A-frames for this year’s beans, more sweet pea structures, all sorts of good stuff.

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Cottage Garden Project Update: January 2016

Well, I say “update”, but there’s really not much activity to report. Earlier in the month our back yard had a light covering of snow:

January 2016 Cottage Garden Project update - snow!
No sign of any sort of garden under a brief blanket of snow.

…which all-but disappeared overnight. Otherwise though, it’s been as soggy as the allotment.

Floral Displays

We do have a few early flowers in the pots that we brought with us from our old house. A few very pale primroses (Primula vulgaris), some bright white cyclamen (Cyclamen hederifolium), a few deep red wallflowers (Erysimum sp., too many to narrow it down) that have lingered through the winter, some white hellebores (Helleborus orientalis, I think) and another hellebore species with very small, dainty green-tinged flowers (Helleborus viridis, most likely).

Just a very small pot-display at the moment, but with many more to come in due course.

Projects / Maintenance

The big news this month is that we’ve taken a major step forward on the Cottage Garden Project planning front: a consultation with local garden designer and Tatton Park RHS Gold Medal winner Joan Mulvenna of Garden Design Manchester.

Joan has a fantastic eye for making the best use of a small space like ours, and within a couple of hours she was able to give us a completely fresh perspective on how we can adapt the space to make it as attractive as possible. It was a great session, well worth Joan’s very reasonable consultation fee.

I’ll be revealing our future plans in more detail in a fresh blog post once Jo and I have had a chance to incorporate our own ideas into Joan’s outline and get them down on paper.

That’s it for January. Hopefully we’ll have a bit more to report at the end of February.

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