A Pretty Decent Chilli Harvest

Well, the chillis that I sowed back in January and have been nurturing in the greenhouse have been steadily growing away; setting flower, fruiting and now ripening up nicely. Here they are the other day:

September 2016 chillis
The left-hand side of the shelving, with cayenne, and prairie fire.
September 2016 chillis
The right-hand side of the shelving, with cayenne, pot black and habanero / scotch bonnet.

I’m quite pleased with the size of the plants and the number of fruits, considering that it’s my first year giving chillis a serious go, and that I didn’t get round to putting any of them in the chilligrow planter than I bought specially for the purpose. Next year, definitely (I have plans for reorganising the greenhouse along more sensible lines…)

Most of the fruits that have ripened so far are the standard ‘cayenne’ variety, probably the one you see in most supermarkets. They’ve either been shared around (it’s a minor irony that I love growing chilli plants for some reason, but I’m not all that keen on cooking with them, as I tend to prefer spice to heat) or have been set aside for a batch of chilli jam. There are a few small fruits on one of the habanero / scotch bonnet plants that have ripened to bright red already. I might sneak those into the chilli jam as well, just to give it a bit of a kick.

Here are a couple of close-ups on the more interesting varieties – ‘pot black’ and ‘prairie fire’ that haven’t quite ripened yet:

September 2016 chilli 'pot black'
These glossy purple-black fruits are lovely to look at, but I don’t think they’re ready to eat yet.
September 2016 chilli 'prairie fire'
Ripening up gradually, from yellow through purplish orange, to red, eventually (?)

I’m hoping the burst of warm weather we’re having this week will help them along towards ripening at long last.

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