It’s Tromboncino Time

A few weeks ago I placed an order for a few packets of seeds from Suttons and ticked the box on the order form to receive two plug plants of Squash (Cucurbita pepo) ‘tromboncino’ (which, according to one online translator app means “spigot-type grenade launcher”… the mind boggles).

It was partly because I’m a sucker for free plants (who isn’t?) and partly because I fancied entering the inaugural Suttons Cup Competition to see who can grow the longest tromboncino fruit. Or at least, see how close I could get to something worth entering in the competition. It’s just a bit of fun, after all.

The plug plants arrived on Tuesday, neatly packaged up:

April 2016 squash tromboncino super-plugs from Suttons
Nicely packaged, with explanatory booklet and a £5 discount voucher as well.

They both had good (only slightly nitrogen-deficient) leaves and a healthy (if slightly module-bound) root system. I’m assuming they’ve been grown in hothouse conditions to bring them on to this size in so small an amount of growing medium:

April 2016 - Suttons tromboncino plugs - roots
A decent root-system on these, that just needs room to breathe.

The first job was to tease out those roots and then plant the plugs in small pots with some fresh multi-purpose compost. A good watering with a liquid feed late, and they were onto a greenhouse shelf to recover from their postal ordeal and re-establish themselves.

April 2016 - Tromboncino plants potted up
A couple of weeks in a small pot to recover and then on into a larger one with room to grow.

In a couple of weeks’ time I’ll pot them on again into an intermediary container before working out where I’ll be keeping them in the long-term. Squash ‘tromboncino’ is a vigorous climber, so I’ll need to provide sturdy support. And given my relatively poor track record with squashes to-date, I’ll need to read up on suggested optimal growing conditions and general care / feeding instructions as well.

I did mention it’s just a bit of fun, didn’t I..?

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2 comments

  1. Annoné Butler says:

    I gave my daughter a couple of trombocino plants last year. She planted them straight in the ground but didn’t provide any climbing support. At one point I received a phone call where she, rather hysterically, informed me that the plants were attempting to colonise two adjoining gardens! I’ve never seen such a rate of growth and the fruits were good eaten very young or left, in which case they look a bit like an elongated butternut squash. Great fun and I’d buy then for that alone. I’ve ordered some more this year but I’m planning on growing them upwards……

    • Darren T says:

      Ah, thank you very much indeed for the tip. I’ll ring around the local scaffolding companies for quotes, see who can do me the best deal 🙂

      Mind you, they’re still only a few inches tall at this stage – I expect they won’t get going properly until temperatures come up a bit more and I can get them into the ground.

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